Paths to Practice

Students prepare for moot court

Pace Law’s Paths to Practice curricular approach provides students with a roadmap for pursuing their particular interest in law, with a focus on the knowledge and skills actually needed to work in particular specialties. Our Advanced Certificates in Environmental Law and International Law are grounded in interdisciplinary subject matter and encourage engagement with law on a global level.

The Concentrations start with required foundational courses in a given area, build on those courses with intermediate doctrinal electives and related courses, and culminate with a practical skills-based capstone experience. Students must notify the Registrar of their intention to pursue a Certificate or Concentration, and they must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 or better, with an average grade of B or better in Certificate/Concentration courses.

Our Professional Tracks provide a more flexible way for students to organize their course selections around a particular practice interest. The Professional Tracks are recommended courses and course sequences, and no notification or minimum GPA is necessary.

Advanced Certificates

Advanced Certificate in Environmental Law

JD candidates at Pace Law may structure their courses of study to attain Advanced Certificates in Environmental Law as part of their law degrees. Authorized by the New York State Department of Education and offered to both practicing attorneys and current students, this certificate signifies proficiency in the fundamentals of environmental law and provides a basic grounding for practice in the field.

Learn more about the Advanced Certificate in Environmental Law

Advanced Certificate in International Law

The Advanced Certificate in International Law is awarded to JD students upon their graduation.  To earn the Certificate, students must have successfully completed 12 academic credits in qualifying international law courses. 

To learn more about the Advanced Certificate in International Law

Concentrations

Business Law

If you considering the Business Law concentration, you may be preparing for practice in any of the following settings:

  • Corporate practice of a large or midsize law firm
  • Legal department of a company, private equity/venture capital firm, hedge fund, or other large organization
  • Compliance department of a bank, investment fund, securities broker-dealer, insurance company, or other financial institution
  • Law firm or consultancy advising financial industry clients on regulatory compliance matters
  • Federal or state regulatory agency responsible for financial services industry

 

If you have a concentration in Business Law, you may do any of the following in practice:

  • Advise clients in the formation, operation, and dissolution of business and non-profit entities
  • Structure asset or stock purchases, sales, and mergers and acquisitions with other business entities
  • Arrange financing, via debt or equity vehicles, for the activities of business entities
  • Structure early-stage, venture capital investments via venture debt or venture equity
  • Structure, negotiate, and memorialize commercial transactions, including the purchase, sale, or lease of goods and services
  • Assure that the internal affairs of business entities or financial services companies are conducted in accordance with applicable laws, regulations and relevant governing documents of the entity
  • Represent business entities in litigation and dispute resolution/counseling
  • Draft compliance policies and procedures for a financial services institution
  • Design and conduct regulatory compliance surveillance plans, audits or investigations of financial services institutions
  • Advise on the structure of financial transactions, business units, and major asset holdings of financial services institutions.

 

Tracks Within Business Law Concentration

Depending on a student’s particular area of interest, a student may choose one (but not both) of two tracks within the Business Law Concentration: (a) Corporate; or (b) Financial Compliance.  In either case, qualifying students may earn a concentration that will be listed on their transcripts as either (but not both) “Business Law-Corporate Concentration” or “Business Law-Financial Compliance Concentration.”

Requirements

To complete the Business Law Concentration (whether the Business Law-Corporate Concentration track or the Business Law-Financial Services Concentration track), a student must complete 7 courses in business-law related subject matters, as described below.

For the Business Law-Corporate Concentration Track:

1) You must take the following 4 Required Courses as early as possible:

  • Corporations and Partnerships
  • Corporate Finance
  • Federal Income Tax I
  • Securities Regulation or Securities Litigation and Enforcement

 

2) You must take at least 2 of the following Electives, totaling at least 5 credits:

  • Accounting for Lawyers
  • Administrative Law
  • Banking Law
  • Business Planning
  • Creditors’ Rights and Bankruptcy
  • Drafting Legal Documents
  • Entertainment Law
  • Fed Tax II (Corporate Tax)
  • Financial Services Compliance Law
  • Global Corporate Governance (Lubin)
  • Govt. Institutions and Business Strategy (Lubin)
  • Insurance Law
  • International Business Transactions
  • Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiation
  • Intro to Private Funds
  • Introduction to Financial Decisionmaking (Lubin)
  • Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Negotiation
  • Org. Behavior and Leadership Skills (Lubin)
  • Survey of Dispute Resolution Processes
  • White Collar Crime

 

3) You must take at least 1 of the following Capstone or Skills Courses:

  • Corporate Law Externship
  • Guided Externship (business placement)
  • Investor Rights Clinic

 

For the Business Law-Financial Services Concentration Track:

1) You must take the following 4 Required Courses as early as possible:

  • Corporations and Partnerships
  • Corporate Finance
  • Financial Services Compliance Law
  • Securities Regulation or Securities Litigation and Enforcement

 

2) You must take at least 2 of the following Electives, totaling at least 5 credits:

  • Accounting for Lawyers
  • Administrative Law
  • Banking Law
  • Business Planning
  • Creditors’ Rights and Bankruptcy
  • Drafting Legal Documents
  • Fed Tax I (Basic)
  • Fed Tax II (Corporate Tax)
  • Global Corporate Governance (Lubin)
  • Govt. Institutions and Business Strategy (Lubin)
  • Insurance Law
  • International Business Transactions
  • Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiation
  • Intro to Private Funds
  • Introduction to Financial Decisionmaking (Lubin)
  • Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Negotiation
  • Org. Behavior and Leadership Skills (Lubin)
  • White Collar Crime

 

3) You must take at least 1 of the following Capstone or Skills Courses:

  • Corporate Law Externship (compliance placement)
  • Guided Externship (compliance placement)
  • Investor Rights Clinic

 

Minimum GPA

In order to qualify for the Business Law Concentration (regardless of track), you must achieve an average of B or better in all Concentration courses, with no grade below a C. You must maintain an overall GPA of 2.5 or better.  You should consult with the following faculty regarding this concentration: Professor Bridget Crawford (during the 2018-2019 academic year).

Business Law Concentration Graduation Worksheet

Civil Litigation/Dispute Resolution

If you are considering the Civil Litigation/Dispute Resolution concentration, you are preparing for practice in the following settings:

  • Small, midsize, or large law firm
  • Nonprofit legal services organization
  • Attorney General’s office or other government agency
  • Corporate or large nonprofit legal department
  • Dispute resolution forum or services provider (e.g., American Arbitration Association, courtannexed mediation program)

You may do any of the following in practice:

  • Assist clients in resolving disputes using formal or informal processes, including litigation, arbitration, mediation, and negotiation

To complete the Civil Litigation/Dispute Resolution concentration, you must complete 8 courses in litigation/ADR-related subject matter. Specifically,

1) You must take the following 5 Required Courses as early as possible:

  • Evidence
  • Lawyering; Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiation; Negotiation (one of these three courses)
  • Pre-trial Civil Litigation Simulation or Advanced Civil Procedure: E-Discovery
  • Trial Advocacy
  • One of the following:
    • Survey of Dispute Resolution Processes
    • Mediation Seminar and Commercial Arbitration Law and Practice
    • Environmental Dispute Resolution
    • International Commercial Arbitration

2) You must take at least 2 of the following Electives, totaling at least 6 credits (note that no course may be used as both a Required Course and an Elective):

  • Administrative Law
  • Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiation
  • Advanced Appellate Advocacy
  • Lawyering
  • Advanced Civil Procedure Seminar
  • Mediation
  • Advanced Civil Procedure: E-Discovery
  • Mediation Practicum
  • Advanced Trial Advocacy
  • Negotiation
  • Civil Rights Litigation
  • New York Practice
  • Collaborative Law
  • Pre-Trial Civil Litigation Simulation
  • Commercial Arbitration Law and Practice
  • Skills Workshop: Arbitration Advocacy
  • Environmental Dispute Resolution
  • Skills Workshop: Depositions
  • Federal Judicial Honors Externship
  • Skills Workshop: Forensics
  • Guided Externship: Civil Rights
  • State Judicial Externship
  • International Commercial Arbitration
  • Survey of Dispute Resolution Processes

3) You must take at least 1 of the following capstone or skills courses:

  • Disability Rights Clinic
  • Immigration Justice Clinic
  • Environmental Law Externship (civil)
  • Investor Rights Clinic
  • Environmental Litigation Clinic
  • Legal Services Externship (civil)
  • Family Court Externship
  • Neighborhood Justice Clinic

Additionally, you should participate in one or more student competitions (Moot Court, Trial Advocacy or Client Counseling) through the Advocacy Programs.

In order to qualify for the concentration, you must achieve an average of B or better in concentration courses, with no grade below a C. You must maintain an overall GPA of 2.5 or better. 

Criminal Practice

If you are considering the Criminal Practice concentration, you are preparing for practice in the following settings:

  • Small or midsize law firm or public defender’s office
  • State or local prosecutor’s office or city attorney’s office
  • Public interest organization focused on criminal representation, or issue advocacy

You may do any of the following in practice:

  • Advise clients charged with crimes, either juveniles, adults or both
  • Draft motions, petitions, subpoenas, appeals, and other documents related to prosecuting or defending criminal cases
  • Negotiate resolution of charges or represent clients in court proceedings
  • Create non-custodial sentencing options with local support groups and other agencies
  • Work with immigration agencies and courts

To complete the Criminal Practice concentration, you must complete 7 courses in criminal practicerelated subject matter. Specifically,

You must take the following Required Courses as early as possible:

  • Criminal Procedure Investigation
  • Evidence
  • Criminal Procedure Adjudication OR New York Criminal Procedure

You must take at least 1 of the following Doctrinal Electives:

  • Advanced Issues in Criminal Law
  • Prisoners’ Rights
  • Comparative Criminal Procedure
  • White Collar and Corporate Crime
  • Juvenile Justice

You must take at least 1 of the following Capstone or Simulation Courses:

  • Advanced Appellate Advocacy
  • Interviewing, Counseling and Negotiation
  • Advanced Research Skills
  • Trial Advocacy
  • Advanced Trial Advocacy

You must take at least 2 of the following Professional Experience Courses:

  • Criminal Justice Clinic
  • Human Rights in Action Externship (in an approved criminal tribunal)
  • Federal Criminal Pretrial Litigation
  • Prosecution Externship
  • Honors Prosecution Externship
  • State Judicial Externship (in criminal court)

In order to qualify for the Concentration, you must achieve an average of B or better in Concentration courses, with no grade below a C. You must maintain an overall GPA of 2.5 or better.

Real Estate and Land Use

If you are thinking about the Real Estate and Land Use concentration, you are preparing for practice in:

  • Small, midsize, or large law firm
  • Municipal government law department
  • Local, state, or federal agency
  • Private sector development company
  • Private company with significant real estate holdings
  • Large non-profits, such as hospitals, with such holdings

You may do any of the following in practice:

  • Advise private, civic, and public agency clients regarding applicable land use regulations
  • Assist these clients in reviewing development proposals with an eye toward furthering, improving, or opposing them.
  • Bring or defend actions challenging state and local government decisions regarding land use and development
  • Represent buyers, sellers, developers, banks, and investors in structuring and executing transactions for the transfer, lease, development, and financing of real estate
  • Advise clients regarding the close relationship between real estate transactions and state and local land use regulation

To complete the Real Estate and Land Use concentration, you must complete a minimum of 15 credits in real estate and land use courses (with at least 9 credits in Required Courses). Specifically,

You must take 9 credits from the following Required Courses as early as possible: 

  • Commercial Real Estate Transactions: Skills (3) or Finance and the Real Estate Business (2)
  • Land Use Law (3)
  • Real Estate Transactions and Finance (4)

You must take at least one of the following Experiential Courses:

  • Advanced Land Use & Sustainable Development Seminar (Theory) or (Skills) (2)
  • Legal Services Externship or Guided Externship (2 or 3)
  • Real Estate Law Externship (2 or 3)

You must earn the balance of your credits from one or more of the following Elective Courses:

  • Administrative Law (3)
  • Environmental Dispute Resolution (3)
  • Advanced Land Use Seminar (2)
  • The Real Estate Business (2)
  • Advanced Real Property (3)
  • Historic Preservation (2)
  • Commercial Leasing (2 or 3)
  • Housing Development & Discrimination (2)
  • Commercial Real Estate Transactions: Skills (3)
  • Sustainable Development Law Survey (3)
  • Construction Law (2)
  • Workouts (2)
  • Environmental Commercial Transactions (2)

In order to qualify for the Concentration, you must achieve an average of B or better in Concentration courses, with no grade below a C. You must maintain an overall GPA of 2.5 or better.

Women, Gender & the Law

Requirements

At least 15 total credits are required for successful completion of the concentration. With the exception of the Foundational Course, ordinarily advance approval of the concentration director is required. See “Additional Requirements” below.

The concentration requirements are as follows:

Foundational Course (required class):
o Family Law

Focused Courses (at least 1 is required; select any from this list):
o Advanced Family Law
o Advanced Issues in Criminal Law
o Advanced Issues in Criminal Law: Sex Crimes
o Bioethics and Medical Malpractice
o Civil Rights Law
o Collaborative Law
o Comparative Family Law
o Critical Race Theory
o Employment Discrimination
o Employment Law Survey
o Feminist Legal Theory
o Public Health Law
o Sexuality, Gender & the Law

Related Courses
(at least 4 required; select any from this list and/or list of "Focused Courses" and/or list of "Capstone/Skills Courses," provided that same course may not be counted in satisfaction of the requirement of 4 "Related Courses" and the requirement of 1 "Foundational Course" and 1 "Capstone/Skills Course"):
o Asylum & Comparative Refugee Law
o Animal Law
o Children and the Law
o Environmental Justice
o Elder Law
o Estate & Gift Tax Law & Planning
o Estate Planning
o Federal Estate & Gift Taxation
o Health Law in America
o Human Rights and the Environment
o Immigration Law
o International Criminal Law
o International Human Rights
o Internet Law: Regulation of Social Media
o Juvenile Justice
o Law and Education
o Matrimonial Practice
o Poverty Law
o Prisoners’ Rights
o Privacy and Information Law
o Prosecution of War Crimes
o Surrogates Practice
o Wills, Trusts & Estates
o Such one or more other courses as may be designated from time to time by mutual agreement of the Concentration Director and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Capstone/Skills Courses
(at least 1 is required; select any from this list):

  • Family Court Externship (3 credits)
  • Externship: Legal Services/Public Interest/Health Law (with advance approval of concentration director and faculty supervisor; sex-related or gender-related placement required)
  • Externship: Criminal Justice (with advance approval of concentration director and faculty supervisor; sex-related or gender-related placement required)
  • Guided Externship (with advance approval of concentration director and faculty supervisor; sex-related or gender-related placement required)
  • Guided Research (minimum 2 credits) (with advance approval of concentration director and faculty supervisor; sex-related or gender-related project required; further note that guided research does not satisfy any other skills-related requirement the school may have)
  • Advanced Legal Research (with advance approval of concentration director and faculty instructor; sex-related or gender-related final project required)
  • Pro Bono Scholars Program participation (with advance approval of concentration director and faculty instructor; sex-related or gender-related placement required)
  • Any seminar in which student submits a paper that would be eligible to earn upper-level writing requirement (with advance approval of concentration director and faculty instructor of seminar; sex-related or gender-related final paper required; further note that a seminar paper does not satisfy any other skills-related requirement the school may have)
  • Any semester-long involvement in clinical program offered by John Jay Legal Services (with advance approval of concentration director and Director of John Jay Legal Services; sex-related or gender-related casework required)
     

Additional Requirements:
With the exception of the Foundational Course, in order for any course to count toward satisfaction of the concentration requirements, then ordinarily before the end of the drop/add period of the term in which the student is enrolled in the particular course, the student must present to and have signed by the concentration director a form available from the Registrar’s Office. That form will require the student to provide a short (one paragraph) description of how the course relates to the concentration. The purpose of this requirement is to provide opportunities for interaction, guidance and feedback so that the student is able to choose a deliberate and cohesive program of study that is unified in its relevance to women, gender and the law.

Students who have taken or are enrolled in courses that they wish to have retroactively counted toward the concentration should meet with the concentration director. You will need to prepare and have signed by the concentration director a form available from the Registrar’s Office. That form will require the student to provide a short (one paragraph) description of how each course sought to be retroactively applied relates to the concentration.

As is the requirement in other approved Concentrations, all candidates must maintain an average grade of B or better in the Concentration courses and may have no grade below C in any of the Concentration courses. In addition, all candidates must maintain an overall GPA of 2.5 or better.

Women Gender Law Concentration Graduation Worksheet

Professional Tracks

Family Law

If you are thinking about Family Law as an area of practice, you are preparing for internship or permanent placements in the following settings:

  • Small or midsize law firm
  • State or local government agency focusing on legal issues of the family and/or children
  • Legal services office representing parents or children
  • Non-profit organization focusing on legal issues of the family and/or children

You may do any of the following in practice:

  • Advise clients on issues regarding the formation, maintenance, and dissolution of family relationships, including marital and parent/child relationships
  • Litigate or mediate actions related to divorce, orders of protection, paternity, child custody, support, and related matters
  • Draft agreements resolving issues of separation, division of assets, maintenance, and related matters
  • Represent children in matters of child protection, adoption, guardianship, or juvenile justice
  • Prosecute or defend clients in child neglect, child abuse, or juvenile delinquency cases

For the professional track in Family Law, 

You should consult with the following faculty regarding this professional track: Ben Asher, Rogers, Sobie

Note: Students pursuing this professional track should consider combining it with the Civil Litigation/Dispute Resolution concentration or the Criminal Practice concentration

  1. You should take the following foundational course as early as possible:
    • Family Law
  2. You should take at least 3 of the following intermediate courses:
    • Accounting for Lawyers
    • Advanced Family Law
    • Children and the Law
    • Elder Law
    • Federal Income Tax I
    • Intl and Comparative Family Law
    • Interviewing, Counseling & Negotiation
    • Juvenile Justice
    • Mental Disability Law
    • Trial Advocacy
    • Sexuality, Gender and the Law
    • Wills and Trusts
  3. You should take at least 2 of the following capstone or skills courses:
    • Collaborative Law
    • Disability Rights Clinic
    • Family Court Externship
    • Matrimonial Practice
    • Legal Services Externship with a family law placement
    • State Judicial Externship with a family court placement
    • Guided Externship with a family law placement

You should consult with the following faculty regarding this professional track: Ben Asher, Rogers, Sobie

Note: Students pursuing this professional track should consider combining it with the Civil Litigation/Dispute Resolution concentration or the Criminal Practice concentration

Health Law

If you are thinking about Health Law as an area of practice, you are preparing for internships or permanent placements in the following settings:

  • Small, midsize, or large law firm
  • Legal department of a healthcare institution
  • Legal or regulatory affairs department of a pharmaceutical company
  • Legal department of an insurance company
  • Federal, state, or local government agency regulating the healthcare  industry or its participants

You may do any of the following in practice:

  • Represent any of the participants in the healthcare industry: patients, physicians and other providers, hospitals and health systems, nursing homes and other care facilities, insurance companies, pharmaceutical manufacturers, pharmaceutical distributors, pharmacy benefit management companies, or government agencies
  • Litigate or otherwise resolve disputes regarding rights or responsibilities of one of the participants in the healthcare industry
  • Structure and negotiate transactions between industry participants, including mergers, acquisitions, physician service agreements, joint ventures, and other strategic arrangements
  • Develop public policy affecting industry participants    

For the professional track in Health Law,

You should take the following foundational course(s) as early as possible:

  • Introduction to Health Law
  • Administrative Law

You should take 3 of the following intermediate courses:

  • Bioethics and Medical Malpractice
  • Public Health Law
  • Elder Law
  • Mental Disability Law
  • Nonprofit Organizations

You should take at least 1 of the following capstone or skills courses:

  • Legal Services Externship
  • Disability Rights/Health Law Clinic

You should consult with the following faculty regarding this professional track: Atwell, Fentiman, Flint

Note: Students pursuing this professional track should consider taking courses from the Business Law and Civil Litigation/Dispute Resolution concentrations

Immigration Law

If you are thinking about Immigration Practice as an area of practice, you are preparing for internship or permanent placements in the following settings:

  • Small or midsize law firm
  • Nonprofit organization focused on issues of immigration, asylum, and the needs of foreign nationals living in the U.S.
  • Government agency focused on administering claims and proceedings under immigration law
  • Immigration Court (as a clerk or a judge)
  • Board of Immigration Appeals

You may do any of the following in practice:

  • Represent individuals seeking visas, refugee status, asylum, or naturalization
  • Litigate removal proceedings on behalf of individuals or the government  
  • Advise corporations or other organizations regarding visa issues relating to their international employees
  • Draft and advocate for changes in immigration law and regulation  

For the professional track in Immigration Practice,

You should take the following foundational course as early as possible:

  • Immigration Law

You should take at least 3 of the following intermediate courses:

  • Administrative Law
  • Advanced Legal Research
  • Asylum & Comparative Refugee Law
  • Evidence
  • International Human Rights Seminar
  • International Law
  • Interviewing Counseling and Negotiation
  • Trial Advocacy

You should take the following capstone or skills course:

  • Immigration Justice Clinic

You should consider taking one of the following additional skills courses:

  • Legal Services Externship (immigration placement)
  • Neighborhood Justice Clinic
  • Semester in Practice (Immigration Justice Clinic placement)

You should consult with the following faculty regarding this professional track: Merton

Note: Note: Students pursuing this professional track should consider taking courses from the Civil Litigation/Dispute Resolution concentration.  Students should also work at developing or enhancing foreign language skills in connection with pursuing a practice in immigration law.

Intellectual Property

If you are thinking about Intellectual Property as an area of practice, you are preparing for internships or permanent placements in the following settings:

  • Small, midsize, or large law firm
  • Corporate legal department
  • Government agencies such as the U. S. Patent & Trademark Office or U.S. Copyright Office
  • Public policy research organization (e.g. the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Electronic Privacy Information Center, Public Citizen, the Center for Democracy & Technology)

You may do any of the following in practice:

  • Assist clients in securing intellectual property (“IP”) rights in their artistic, literary, scientific or technical creations
  • Enforce clients’ IP rights against others using litigation and other dispute resolution processes
  • Negotiate business transactions to sell, license, or otherwise exploit IP rights
  • Counsel clients by providing opinions relating to procuring IP rights, invalidating IP assets, and avoiding infringement of IP assets, especially in the corporate transactions context
  • Engage in policy research and advocacy on IP and related issues

For the professional track in Intellectual Property,

  1. You should take the following foundational course as early as possible:
    • Survey of Intellectual Property
  2. You should take at least 2 of the following intermediate courses:
    • Copyright Law
    • Patent Law
    • Trademark Law
  3. You should take at least 2 of the following related courses:
    • Antitrust Law
    • Art Law
    • Communications Law
    • Computer Law
    • Constitutional Law Seminar (Free Speech)
    • Entertainment Law
    • Privacy and Information Law
    • Sports Law
  4. You should take at least 2 of the following capstone or skills courses:
    • Corporate Law Externship (IP placement)
    • Guided Externship (IP placement)
    • IP Agreements & Licensing
    • International Intellectual Property Law
    • Patent Practice & Procedure
    • Trademark Practice & Procedure

You should consult with the following faculty regarding this professional track: Anderson

Note: Students pursuing this professional track should consider taking courses from the Business Law and Civil Litigation/Dispute Resolution concentrations.

Labor and Employment Law

If you are thinking about Labor and Employment Law as an area of practice, you are preparing for internships or permanent placements in the following settings:

  • Small, midsize, or large law firm
  • Corporate legal department
  • Legal department of a labor union
  • Government agencies such as the NLRB, EEOC, New State Division of Human Rights, or New York City Commission on Human Rights
  • Public interest organization focused on employment discrimination issues

You may do any of the following in practice:

  • Assist clients in establishing and managing all aspects of the employer-employee relationship, including employment agreements and employee handbooks, benefits and retirement programs, workers’ compensation issues, and occupational safety and health issues;
  • Enforce clients’ rights against discrimination in the workplace on the basis of race, gender, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, age, or disability;
  • Assist clients in all aspects of the collective bargaining process, including organizing, managing bargaining unit elections, negotiating collective bargaining agreements, and managing and enforcing such agreements

For the professional track in Labor and Employment,

  1. You should take the following core courses:
    • Employment Law Survey OR Employment Law AND Employment Discrimination
    • Labor Law
  2. You should take at least 3 of the following related courses:
    • Antitrust Law
    • Administrative Law
    • Civil Rights Law
    • Civil Rights Litigation
    • Corporations and Partnerships
    • Drafting Legal Documents
    • Interviewing, Counseling and Negotiation
    • Negotiation
    • Sports Law
    • Survey of Dispute Resolution Processes
  3. You should take at least 1 of the following clinics or externships:
    • Corporate Law Externship (employment law placement)
    • Disability Rights Clinic
    • Guided Externship (labor or employment law placement)
    • Legal Services Externship (employment discrimination placement)

You should consult with the following faculty regarding this professional track: McLaughlin, Waldman

Note: Students pursuing this professional track should consider taking courses from the Business Law and Civil Litigation/Dispute Resolution concentrations.

Law and Technology

If you are thinking about Law and Technology as an area of practice, you are preparing for internships or permanent placements in the following settings:

  • Consulting firm or other alternative professional setting

You may do any of the following in practice:

  • Advise clients regarding effect of technology on their legal or regulatory position
  • Assist clients in planning use of technology in pursuing litigation or corporate strategy

For the professional track in Law and Technology,

You should take at least 3 of the following courses:

  • Advanced Civil Procedure: E-Discovery
  • Advanced Issues in Criminal Law: Computer Crime
  • Communications Law
  • Computer Law
  • Internet Law: Regulation of Social Media
  • Privacy and Information Law

You should take 1 or 2 courses in the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems

You should consult with the following faculty regarding this concentration: Anderson, Garfield

Note: Students pursuing this professional track should combine it with courses from the concentrations in Business Law, Civil Litigation/Dispute Resolution, and from the Intellectual Property professional track.

Tax

If you are thinking about Tax as an area of practice, you are preparing for internship or permanent placements in the following settings:

  • Small, midsize, or large law firm
  • Non-profit organizations, corporations, accounting firms and banks

You may do any of the following in practice:

  • Advise clients on business and personal practices to comply with the law and plan for their futures
  • Litigate disputes between taxpayers and governmental authorities

For the professional track in Tax,

You should take the following foundational courses as early as possible:

  • Federal Income Taxation I (Basic)
  • Federal Income Taxation II (Corporate)
  • Federal Estate and Gift Taxation
  • Tax Policy Seminar

You should take at least 1 of the following intermediate courses:

  • Drafting Legal Documents
  • Elder Law
  • Estate Planning

You may wish to take several of the following related courses:

  • Wills, Trusts and Estates
  • Surrogate’s Practice
  • Corporations
  • Family Law
  • Nonprofit Organizations
  • Accounting for Lawyers
  • Administrative Law
  • Business Planning

You should consult with the following faculty regarding this professional track: Crawford

Trusts and Estates

If you are thinking about Trusts and Estates as an area of practice, you are preparing for internship or permanent placements in the following settings:

  • Small, midsize, or large law firm

You may do any of the following in practice:

  • Advise clients on the transfer of wealth, either during their lifetimes or at the end of their lives
  • Draft wills and other documents related to the transfer and maintenance of assets
  • Administer trusts
  • Litigate disputes among heirs

For the professional track in Trusts and Estates,

  1. You should take the following 2 foundational courses as early as possible:
    • Wills, Trusts, and Estates
    • Federal Estate and Gift Tax Law and Planning
  2. You should take at least 2 of the following intermediate courses:
    • Drafting Legal Documents
    • Elder Law
    • Estate Planning
    • Nonprofit Organizations
    • Surrogate’s Practice
    • Estate Administration
    • Trusts
    • Advanced Issues in Trusts & Estates
  3. You should take at least 1 of the following skills courses:
    • Disability Rights Clinic
    • Legal Services Externship (Elder Law placement)
    • State Judicial Externship (Surrogate’s Court placement)
  4. You should take at least 1 of the following related courses:
    • Art Law
    • Corporations
    • Family Law
    • Tax Policy

You should consult with the following faculty regarding this professional track: Crawford, Flint, Johnson

Italics indicates course in development.