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Global Consumer Law Forum

 

The Institute of International Commercial Law (IICL) of Pace Law School has created the Global Consumer Law Forum to assemble the leading thinkers and affected parties on consumer law, cross-border e-commerce and alternative dispute resolution to develop the rule of law and systems impacting individual consumer trading (C2C and B2C) in the physical and virtual world, as well as to foster the development of new marketplaces and infrastructure for economic opportunities that will benefit consumers and merchants.

Forum Executive Co-Directors:
 Vikki M. Rogers & Louis Del Duca

 
FORUM LINKS

Global Principles of International Consumer Contracts

Database of National and Regional Consumer Protection Laws (coming late Spring 2011)

Bibliography of International Consumer Law Materials

 
   

   

UNCITRAL, the Institute of International Commercial Law at Pace Law School,
and Penn State University Dickinson School of Law presented a colloquium on

A FRESH LOOK AT ONLINE DISPUTE RESOLUTION (ODR)
AND GLOBAL E-COMMERCE:
TOWARD A PRACTICAL AND FAIR REDRESS SYSTEM
FOR THE
21ST CENTURY TRADER
(CONSUMER AND MERCHANT)

March 29–30, 2010
United Nations Vienna International Centre, Vienna, Austria

VIEW PROGRAM

Click here for Speaker Presentations
 

 


The Global Forum is guided by the following principles:

  1. Consumers are domestic and international traders.
  2. The rule of law for consumer traders must necessarily be developed to foster the continued growth of the virtual marketplace. Effective development can best happen when there is collaboration between governments, the private sector, inter-governmental organizations, consumer interest groups, bar associations, and the academic community.
  3. Systems (for rule of law and conflict resolution) established within the virtual marketplace will transcend to domestic economic development and stability, and the creation of new markets.
  4. The development of redress systems is a necessary precursor to cross-border economic growth.
  5. Governments and the private sector must collaborate to provide effective, trustworthy and fair redress systems for consumers engaged in global e-commerce.
  6. A soft law for international consumer contracts will encourage cross-border consumer trade and can be a model for implementation in domestic legal systems.
  7. Centralized dissemination of legal information can foster further commonalities and understanding in the continued development of consumer protection law and redress systems.